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Vegetable Gardening in South Florida

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Flagler Community GardenBeing Florida-friendly doesn't mean you have to suffer dry, barren landscapes. You can conserve water even when you grow your own food. Follow guidelines to plant the right vegetable or fruit at the right time of year and in the right spot in your garden or urban farm. Apply all the remaining FFL principles and you should enjoy a colorful and bountiful harvest all year long.

What’s on the menu? Here are guidelines from the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences. When selecting your seeds or seedlings, remember that Fort Lauderdale is in Zone 10 of the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map.

 Name  When to Grown  Name  When to Grow

Bush Beans

August- April

Lettuce

September- January

Lima Beans

August- April

Mustard

September- March

Pole Beans

August-April

Okra

August- September

Beets

October-April

Onions

September- November

Broccoli

September- January

English Peas

September- February

Cabbage

September- January

Southern Peas

August-April

Cantaloupe

August-September, February- March

Peppers

August- March

Carrots

October-February

Sweet Potatoes

February- June

Celery

October- January

Pumpkin

January-February, August- September

Collards

August- February

Radish

October- March

Sweet Corn

August- March

Spinach

October- January

Cucumbers

September- March

Summer Squash

January- March, September- October

Egg Plant

December- February, August-October

Winter Squash

January- February, September

Endive

September- January

Strawberry

October- November

Kale

September- January

Turnips

October- February

Kohlrabi

October- February

Watermelon

January- March, August- September

 

How is growing your own food sustainable?

Remember that sustainability has three components: people, planet and profit. 

When you grow your own food,you are eliminating the pollution it would take to transport the food to your grocery store and then to your home. In many cases, you will also be using fewer fertilizers and pesticides. Because of the effort involved, chances are that you will eat what your harvest and waste less. When you do have too much, you'll probably share it with your friends and neighbors or local food banks, and that's good for the community. Some of you will even sell your home-grown vegetables at local markets, keeping profits right here in our city. That's sustainability at work!

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